West Minnesota cock has some annoying things at the state fair

West Minnesota cock has some annoying things at the state fair

Here are some annoying things: it’s not all about the fancy feathers in the poultry barn; the Minnesota State Fair even rewards the state’s most noisy cock.

On Wednesday, in the preliminaries of the State Fair Rooster Flock Competition, a series of cocks of various sizes and colors were placed flat. It’s not like Moo-Off–humans can make calls – or as cute as a rabbit agility, but it’s a pleasure of its own, cheering the crowd.

At the Poultry Judging Exhibition, the competition is open to the most proud birds. For the competition, the judges – volunteers from the crowd, so you can do the same – perch around each of the 12 feather contestants and track their crows for half an hour.

“They counted how many complete cocks the birds did – graffiti-made crows,” said Paul Bengtson, the head of the fair poultry barn and the host of the competition.

Most cocks just yell at themselves, but some people do things to fool birds. They can’t touch animals, but volunteer judges – so prejudiced! – Pat their hands, throw away the sawdust bedding around them, shout – let them talk anyway.

“We will have some exhibitors trying to attract their birds to the competition, and these people usually do well in the game,” Bengtson said. “But usually, only your own bird can win it.”

This was the case on Wednesday, when Park Rapids owner and amateur Haakon Vaadeland stood near his bird, lifted his shoulders and lit his light Brahma Bantam Rocky, who was slightly behind his competitors. Plymouth Rock cock is prohibited.

But the banned Plymouth Rock team, which received the highest honor, allowed the Golden Rooster to stand by him.

“You have to know how to talk about chicken,” said Bemidji’s volunteer judge Joe Aitkin, who took home and scammed 49 crows with lavender ribbons. “You must be with the bird.”

It is also helpful to ban Plymouth Rock and light Brahma Bantam before the game begins. As Bengtson, the poultry director said, the cock crows pass the message, “whether it’s their territory or just a phone call and response.”

St. Paul’s 10-year-old judge, Mallorie Taft, took second place with her buff cochin in a different way, with a total of 39 crows. “You just laugh at him,” she said. “If you anger him, he will bark.”

At the same time, Vaadeland is planning the next day’s Rocky and Goldy finals, which is his father’s buff cochin bantam. He said: “Tomorrow they will rest, be more focused, less stressful, because they have already passed.” “They must overcome the pain. … They know that they are champions.”

Cochin in Vaadelands, Goldy only got three crows, “Not finished yet. He is a bit of a market today. He is a warrior. He will be back tomorrow,” Vaadeland said – and then Goldy made a sound. “Now you are crazy!” he said.

The cock team played again in the finals on Thursday. Their total number is accumulated, so they can make up for the silence of the previous day.

The champion gave his host a cool $100 plus the highest score in the qualifier up to $60.

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